Kitchen Whisks: How to Use Five Different Types 1


Please share if you like our content!Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
Share on Facebook
Facebook
Email this to someone
email
Share on Reddit
Reddit
Share on StumbleUpon
StumbleUpon
Share on LinkedIn
Linkedin
Pin on Pinterest
Pinterest

There are many different types of whisks and whips available to the home consumer now. Not only are there standard balloon types, with the wires forming a roundish shape at the end of a grouping of wires, but specialty whisks to work on flat surfaces. Over the past few years, I’ve had my fair share of encounters with whisks and their uses, and thought it was quite fascinating how useful they actually are. This is one cooking information article from MommyMatter that will amaze you!

Here is a guide to five different types and styles of kitchen whisks and whips that are used for both the dessert side, and the kitchen side of cooking.

Standard Wire Whisk

These are the style of whisks most popular in kitchens. They range from cheap versions to more expensive ones. The most simple versions contain nothing more than a group of bent metal wires that are clamped down at the end with a row of twisted wires. More expensive ones will have heat-proof and ergonomic gripping handles, and a sealed portion at the top preventing food from accumulating there. This is handy for professional settings and for home versions. All wire whisks are great for any kitchen application.

Balloon Style Wire Whisk

These whisks are similar to the standard wire whisk, except they form a roundish end where the wires cross each other. This will incorporate more air into the food that is being whipped. It is very handy for whipping egg whites, savory sauces, whipped cream and other foods where introduction of air will be key to its setting up properly.

Coil Rimmed Whisk with Handle or Gravy Whisk

These funny looking thinks look like a wire circle extending from the handle. The wire circle will have another wire going around and around, allowing air to be worked into foods. While the unusual shape may prevent you from picking one up to test, they are very handy as they can be used flat so they cover a lot of ground. The coil rimmed whisk is made for whisking bits of pan drippings into gravies, and also incorporating the flour and other ingredients into the pan drippings as well.

Presto Whip, Twirled Whip, or Up and Down Whip

This whip looks like a standard whip, except the bulb of the whisk comes from one wire going around in a circle, rather than many wires crossing. The purpose of this single wire is that it can be pressed down as it is being used as a whisk. It can blend ingredients quickly as well as whip them. It goes by many different names, but the name comes from how it is used or shaped.

Spatula Whisk or Fish Turner

These tools also go by the name of a fish turner, but it looks like an angled spatula with slots at the ends. It can turn delicate objects safely without breaking them up, such as fish fillets, but also can mix simple mixes together without much introduction of air, such as quick batters.

Whisks and whips can now be found in any number of materials, so choose one that is compatible with your pan. Non-stick cookware will need a silicone or wooden whisk, available at specialty stores. Metal ones can be made with stainless steel to prevent rust.

Please share if you like our content!Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
Share on Facebook
Facebook
Email this to someone
email
Share on Reddit
Reddit
Share on StumbleUpon
StumbleUpon
Share on LinkedIn
Linkedin
Pin on Pinterest
Pinterest

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

One thought on “Kitchen Whisks: How to Use Five Different Types