Pruning Outdoor Flowers


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Here at MommyMatter, we have A LOT of flowers. Between my Daughter’s house and my house, we have hundreds of flowers growing throughout our gardens, pots and the in between. It of course makes for a lot of work, but the beauty of the flowers make it worth every aching moment.

One thing we do a lot of is pruning. It is a daily task, that takes a lot of time if done right. We thought we’d share with you some gardening tips on pruning your outdoor flowers today and make this process a less scary one for you!

Pruning Outdoor Flowers

Growing outdoor flowers can be a joy and a delight, when spring, summer and fall bring staged profusions of flowering plant life that draws butterflies, bumblebees, hummingbirds, and friendly neighbors in for a visit. Selecting the best outdoor flowers for the garden or landscape space is as much about matching the right types of flowering plant life to the growing environment as it is about personal preference.

Nothing can be more discouraging than installing a favorite type of flowering plant only to discover that it fails to make it through to bloom season. Learn from experts about the best outdoor flowers and choose the ones that meet your preferences and growing needs.

Selecting Plants for Your Growing Zone

One of the most important considerations beyond that of simply selecting plants known to flower well and long with a minimum of care is to try to match flowering plant life to your Plant Hardiness Zone. Different hardiness zones will indicate which types of outdoor flowers are likely to fare better in your area. Consult with a local nursery, garden center, or gardening association to learn recommendations for outdoor flowers that grow easily in your hardiness zone.

Outdoor flowers are either perennials or annuals. Knowing what type of outdoor flower you have determines how you will prune it. Perennial flowers bloom once, for a short period in spring, summer or late summer and fall. They die away during winter and come back the following year to bloom again at the same time. Annual flowers bloom continually, if pruned properly, until frost kills them. If you want the same plant next year you have to replant it.

  • Identify whether your outdoor flower is an annual or a perennial.
  • Prune perennial outdoor flowers after their flowers die. Cut off the stems at the base of the plant to keep it looking tidy. Some plants like perennial poppies die after they flower; cut back their foliage, too. Perennials such as dianthus, phlox and candytuft have masses of flowers that cover the leaves of the low-growing plants. Shear off the stems like cutting hair. Don’t worry if you cut off some leaves. The plant will recover. Cut off only the dead flower heads of bulbs. Leave the stems and leaves to turn brown and shrivel up, returning energy back into the bulb for next year’s growth.
  • Cut annual outdoor flowers off as each one dies. Prune the flower stems at the base of the plant to keep it looking tidy. Pruning off the dead flowers, called deadheading, prevents annual plants from going to seed, encouraging them to produce more flowers.

Let your gardening experience be a great one this year and make pruning your outdoor flowers a less tedious task! Hope our gardening tips have helped you today, off to prune some flowers I go.

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