Vegetable Water Garden Watering


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Okay, so this one isn’t so much of a kitchen tip as a garden tip, but if you have a flower garden, flower patch, vegetable garden, raised beds, container garden, or even just a patch of grass that doesn’t look as green as the rest of the yard, definitely keep this tip in mind!

One of the down-sides of boiling potatoes and other vegetables is that a lot of the nutrients leech out into the water. This isn’t particularly a problem with fat-soluble vitamins such as A, D, E, and K, but water-soluble vitamins and minerals use the same transport method in the pot as they do in the body. Dissolve in water and go (or stay) where the water does.

So after you remove the food from the pot, you are left with a nutrient-rich soup that most people just pour down the drain, and then go out and buy fertilizer when their plants or lawn looks weak. A better idea, save that water and use it in the garden. It’s as simple as 1-2-3, and a great way to recycle water one more time and avoid using even more water to water your garden.

Step 1:
Don’t pour that water out! If you spoon the food directly out of the water or utilize an in-pot colander, this is as easy as not doing something. If you traditionally dump everything into a colander in the sink and let the water drain out, then you need to do a little extra. Put another pot under the colander. Sure it’s another dish to wash, but it’s nothing that needs to be scrubbed. I have a bucket that is just for this purpose, not a cleaning bucket, you don’t want unwanted chemicals in your gardens or yard.

Step 2:
Let it cool down completely. Leave it covered on the counter overnight to bring it down to room-temperature. Hot water will just kill your plants, and it’s better to water in the morning anyway. I put my yard bucket outside when I take out the garbage at night, knowing it will be nice and cool come morning for my watering.

Step 3:
Pour the water on your garden/lawn. Pick a different spot each time. Pouring the water out over the same spot each time will result in one gigantic plant/patch with everything else looking puny in comparison. Your vegetable water will be ideal for those damaged areas that our four legged friends make, you know those patches I mean, will help renew those burned areas. Your grass will sigh with relief receiving a nice nutrient filled drink.

You may be thinking, okay these girls at MommyMatter are nuts, but trust us it works! Give it a try yourself and tell us how it went for you. We’d love to see how your vegetable water garden watering went.

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